Rebuilding teeth

Do your teeth seem to be constantly chipping or breaking? Have you lost confidence in the strength of your teeth? Are you so uncertain that you’re now afraid to eat hard foods?

Solutions are available to provide you with renewed confidence in your smile. You can stop wasting time with needless emergency appointments that take you away from work or family.

Read on to discover:

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“Why do my teeth keep breaking”

Why Do My Teeth Keep Breaking

So, you’re concerned about your teeth.

You’re doing your research and you’ve likely come across a lot of information about how you can fix a damaged or broken tooth. But how much have you read about why this tooth may have broken in the first place.

There’re always underlying reasons why teeth break.

In their original form, teeth are extremely strong – in fact they are by far the strongest structure in the body. So why would such a thing break? And why would it break when you’re doing all you can to prevent it?

Most people I see with broken down teeth actually spend time on looking after them. They see a dentist with some regularity to fix problems as they arise. So, the underlying cause is not always neglect…there’s lots of other factors involved.

And if you don’t search for and address these underlying causes, all attempts to fix your teeth will likely come up short.

You can complete the best rebuild on a tooth, using the best materials, the best lab and the best dentist. But if the underlying cause of the original break isn’t addressed, then the new rebuild will be subject to the very same conditions that broke the tooth in the first place. This rebuild will fail…and in a shorter time than you’d like.

If you’re interested in finding out more about this topic, take a look at my 4-part video series on “How to stop the cycle of teeth breakdown”

View the video series

The solutions to rebuild teeth

The material and technique used to rebuild teeth is determined by:

  • The size of the defect in that exists after removing all old filling material, decay and fractures.
  • Your budget

Composite Resin Rollover

Composite (plastic) fillings

These can last a very long time if 60% of your tooth structure remains. Below this figure the tooth has lost a significant amount of its strength and rigidity. Porcelain inlays are an alternative to composite fillings and in almost all circumstances they offer an even more durable and beautiful solution.
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Porcelain onlays

These porcelain restorations are used when only 40% to 60% of your tooth structure remains.

They are made in a laboratory by master ceramicists and are much stronger than the plastic restorations.

They require two visits:
On a limited budget you may consider using composite resin in this situation – but you should always have a longer-term plan in place to convert it over to an onlay within a couple of years. Close monitoring is required if you chose to take this option. While this resin is in place, the tooth is at a greater risk of breakdown. But it’s better that the alternative of leaving a faulty filling in place and waiting until you can afford the onlay! Sometimes this option is chosen to spread out costs, or to allow me to assess the underlying health of a tooth.
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Onlay Rolover

Crown Rolover

Porcelain Crowns

These are useful when less than 40% of your tooth structure remains.
When only this much of the tooth remains, there is not enough solid structure to reliably hold a filling or an onlay.

A crown covers the whole tooth and acts to splint and protect it from further breaking or fracturing.

On a limited budget you may consider using composite resin in this situation – but you should always have a longer-term plan in place to convert it over to a crown within a couple of years. Close monitoring is required if you chose to take this option. While this resin is in place, the tooth is at a greater risk of breakdown. But it’s better that the alternative of leaving a faulty filling in place and waiting until you can afford the crown! Sometimes this option is chosen to spread out costs, or to allow me to assess the underlying health of a tooth.
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“Estimate your dental health”

When my patients come in with problems, the secret is to ask the right set of questions….and then shut up and listen! Very often I can make a diagnosis very close to the mark before I even take a look.

A little while ago, I used this set of questions to develop a great little resource to help you self-assess your own oral health from home.

This Checklist was developed to help you estimate the level of risk and disease in your mouth.

And once you’ve completed the Checklist, a summary document will be available. It’ll
contain easy to follow advice that’s directly related to the condition of your mouth.

It features a simple ’speedometer’ scoring system for an easy visual overview of the findings.

Take me to the Oral Health Checklist

Costs of rebuilding teeth

The answer to this question is quite complex because there may be associated planning costs for x-rays, models, diagnostic work-ups etc.

It should be noted that here at Melbourne Dentist we only use the very best of
materials.

All laboratory work is carried out by master ceramicists in a large Melbourne city-based lab (TDSA)

The basic restoration costs are as follows;

  • Composite resin restorations:
  • Porcelain onlays:
  • Porcelain crowns:

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